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Lupus

A guide for living with lupus

Living with lupus can be challenging and overwhelming. From trying to explain lupus to others, to managing work or school, and trying to make time for yourself, it all can feel like a lot to juggle.

A guide from the Lupus Foundation of America helps to break down some suggestions that can help to ease some of the extra challenges that come along with living with lupus.

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Arthritis

Help to manage your RA symptoms

Often times, people may wonder if there are additional proactive steps that can be taken with regards to their condition.

A helpful resource from the Arthritis Foundation discusses some ways in which those with rheumatoid arthritis can help to manage their symptoms. These suggestions include:

💙Balancing activity with periods of rest when needed. 💙Exercise, such as low-impact aerobics, muscle strengthening and flexibility. 💙And considering heat and cold therapies.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Make time for self-care

There is so much to consider as a caregiver to someone with Alzheimer’s. As Alzheimer’s progresses, your role as a caregiver changes as well.

A helpful resource from the Alzheimer’s Association helps to shed some light on the various aspects of care-giving, including making sure to make time for self-care as well.

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Diabetes

Subtle diabetes symptoms in women

A recent article from SHAPE discusses subtle diabetes symptoms in women. The article touches on type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and pre-diabetes.

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Parkinson's

Billionaire Ken Griffin, Michael J. Fox Foundation stage $10M competition

The Michael J. Fox Foundation is partnering with Ken Griffin to hold a $10 million competition in an effort to spur development of a critical research tool for Parkinson’s disease.

The program is offering a cash incentive for researchers to devise a tracer compound that can bind to a protein in the brain known as alpha-synuclein and illuminate its volume and location on a brain scan.

The majority of the 6 million people living with Parkinson’s worldwide have clumps of alpha-synuclein in their brain, and it is believed to harm cells and result in symptoms of the disease.

The hedge fund manager and the actor, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 1991, are teaming up to find a cure.

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Lupus

Carrie Ann Inaba Talks About Living with Lupus: 'I Stopped Going in the Sun'

American television personality, dancer, choreographer, actress, and and Dancing with the Stars judge Carrie Ann Inaba recently discussed her lupus diagnosis with PeopleMag.

“My doctor didn’t tell me I had lupus,” Carrie Ann Inaba revealed

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Asthma/Allergy

Boy with Severe Peanut Allergy Making Progress on Trial Drug: 'It's Working!' Says Mom

A recent article from People discusses one child’s journey in a clinical trial that is helping him to overcome his severe peanut allergy.

The clinical trial involves consuming a carefully formulated amount of a peanut protein powder each day. It is hoped that after five years of treatment, patients will be able to consume peanut products without concern.

Up for review by the FDA, the treatment has the potential to help more than one million kids and teens

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Heart Health

Does menopause raise the risk for a cardiovascular event?

Recent research shows that women who experience hot flashes and night sweats during menopause may potentially be at higher risk for a cardiovascular event.

Data from over 3,000 women included in the final analysis, with 231 (7.1%) experiencing a cardiovascular event during 22 years of follow-up. The 365 women who reported frequent vasomotor symptoms (at least six episodes of hot flashes or night sweats in the previous 2-week period) had more than twice the risk for a cardiovascular event than those who reported no vasomotor symptoms at baseline.

ortFurther research is needed to establish causality. The findings were recently presented at the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) 2019 Annual Meeting.

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Heart Health

Today is World Heart Day!

Today is World Heart Day! World Heart Day was created to inform people around the world about cardiovascular disease.

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, is the world’s leading cause of death. Each year, cardiovascular disease claims 17.9 million lives. This day highlights the actions that can be taken to prevent and control cardiovascular disease.

The World Heart Federation suggests a few ways to look after your heart:

❤ Eat well and drink wisely: for example, choose water, fresh fruit and vegetables, and limit processed foods. ❤ Stay active: aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity 5 times a week, or 75 minutes spread throughout the week of vigorous-intensity activity. ❤ Say no to smoking: within 2 years of quitting, the risk of coronary heart disease is significantly reduced, and within 15 years the risk of cardiovascular disease returns to that of a non-smoker.

Share to spread awareness! ❤

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Multiple Sclerosis

The four basic disease courses of MS

MS typically follows four basic disease courses, which are also known as types or phenotypes. These are:

🧠Clinically isolated syndrome 🧠Relapsing remitting 🧠Secondary progressive 🧠Primary progressive

A helpful resource from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society explains the four types and more.

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Epilepsy

Seizure First Aid and Safety

Seizures and epilepsy are among the most common neurological problems affecting children and youth. According to the Epilepsy Foundation of America:

🧠1 out of 10 people worldwide will have a seizure in their lifetime. 🧠 Epilepsy, or recurring seizures, develops in 1 in 26 people during their lifetime.

There are steps that can be taken with regards to seizure first aid and safety. A helpful resource from the Epilepsy Foundation of America helps to explain some steps that can be taken.

Find videos and information about what to do when someone has a seizure.

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Diabetes

Differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes

We frequently receive many questions regarding the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. 🤔💭

A helpful resource from WebMD discusses the different types of diabetes, possible treatments, and more.

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Arthritis

Certain forms of exercise can benefit those with chronic pain

An interesting recent article from NPR discusses how certain forms of exercise can benefit those with chronic pain.

Exercise helps those with chronic pain through several ways:

💪Building up muscles surrounding the hurting joint helps to stabilize it. Further, it also increases lubrication of the cartilage.

💪Exercise may also cause changes in the brain that can make a big difference in damping down pain.

💪Further, exercise can also help to decrease stress. Stress can make people more sensitive to pain.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Head device reduces memory loss in 7 out of 8 people

🔬🧠Recent research involving eight Alzheimer’s patients found that a new wearable device emitting electromagnetic impulses was able to significantly improve memory loss in seven of these participants within two months.🧠🔬

Researchers worked with the participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease and their caretakers. The participants wore the device twice a day for two months, with each session lasting one hour.

At the end of the two months, none of the participants had experienced any side effects. The investigators also used The Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale test (ADAS-cog), the most widely recognized method of assessing cognitive function. It was found that seven of the eight participants saw an increase of over 4 points in cognitive performance on the ADAS-cog scale after two months. According to the researchers, it is as if the participants’ cognitive function had “rejuvenated” by a year.

While far more research is needed regarding the device, scientists are encouraged by these preliminary findings. It is reported that another trial is due to last around 17 months, on average, and will include about 150 participants with a diagnosis of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The findings from this study have been published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

A clinical trial has found that an innovative electromagnetic therapy device significantly reduced memory loss in seven out of the eight participants.

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Parkinson's

How 'exergaming' can help people with Parkinson's

A recent article from Medical News Today discusses how exergaming, that is, exercise paired with computer gaming, can be beneficial to those with Parkinson’s.

Researchers from the Department of Neurology at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour at Radboud University Medical Center studied a control group (who did stretching exercises), and a second group (who used stationary bikes at home). The latter group showed a significant improvement in motor ability — comparable with that achieved by several conventional Parkinson’s drugs.

The bike group, who cycled 30–45 minutes three times per week for 6 months, received exercise bikes with screens and games designed to motivate them. It was found that Parkinson’s patients who exercised with bikes had significantly improved their motor ability compared with those who simply stretched.

Further research is needed on the subject to fully understand possible benefits. The findings have been published in The Lancet Neurology.

New research investigates the benefits of an at-home computer game exercising program for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

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Migraines

Migraine may raise dementia, Alzheimer's risk

🔬🧠Recent research shows that migraines may be associated with an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s.🧠🔬

Researchers from the University of Waterloo, in Ontario, Canada analyzed data from 679 study participants aged 65 or older. It was found that the odds of having migraine were nearly three times higher in people with dementia than those without dementia. The odds of migraine were slightly more than four times higher in those with Alzheimer’s than in those without it. The study authors concluded that migraines were a significant risk factor.

Further research is needed on the subject. The findings from this study have been published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

New research finds a ‘significant’ association between a history of migraine and various forms of dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease in particular.

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Asthma/Allergy

Peanut Allergy Treatment Palforzia Is One Step Closer to Market

A new biologic drug to treat a peanut allergy has received a vote of support from an advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The therapy is designed to reduce the incidence and severity of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, after accidental peanut exposure in children age 4 through 17 who have a confirmed diagnosis of a peanut allergy.

The application for approval is currently under review by the FDA, with a review action date of late January 2020.

The FDA has shown support for a therapy that could save lives and ease anxiety for millions of families.

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Heart Health

Vegetarians and vegans may have a higher risk of stroke than meat eaters, but carnivores have a higher risk of heart disease

🔬🥑Recent research shows that vegans and vegetarians may be at a higher risk for stroke, but meat eaters have a higher risk of heart disease.🥩🔬

Researchers from Oxford University looked at the dietary habits and health of 48,188 participants in the UK over the course of 18 years. It was found that participants with a plant-based diet had lower rates of heart disease but higher rates of stroke than meat eaters, specifically a hemorrhagic stroke. However, those who avoided meat but ate fish, had a lower risk of heart disease without increasing their risk for stroke.

Further research is needed on the topic. The findings from this study have been published in The BMJ.

The study followed nearly 50,000 people for 18 years. Meat eaters had a higher risk of heart disease, and pescatarians fared best overall.

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Lupus

Breakthrough therapy designation to obinutuzumab for patients with lupus nephritis

The FDA recently granted breakthrough therapy designation to obinutuzumab for patients with lupus nephritis.

The designation arrived after the medication showed positive results from a phase 2 study.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Frontotemporal dementia: Devastating, prevalent and little understood

A recent article and interview from 60 Minutes discusses frontotemporal dementia, or FTD.

FTD is the number one form of dementia in Americans under the age of 60. The causes of this condition are unclear.

The condition attacks the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, the areas controlling personality and speech. Individuals will either display such uncharacteristic behavior that their loved ones can hardly recognize them, or they lose the ability to recognize themselves.

Bill Whitaker reports on FTD, a devastating illness and the most common form of dementia for Americans under the age of 60

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Arthritis

Kim Kardashian's Psoriatic Arthritis Diagnosis Is Directly Tied To Struggles With Psoriasis

After further testing, it has been revealed that Kim Kardashian has been diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis.

According to the American College of Rheumatology, psoriatic arthritis is a type of inflammatory arthritis that occurs in individuals with psoriasis. The main symptoms include painful, stiff and swollen joints. The cause of psoriatic arthritis is currently unknown, however, of those with psoriatic arthritis, 40 percent also have a family member with psoriasis or arthritis.

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Parkinson's

Prostate drug may slow Parkinson's disease

Recent research shows that a prostate medication may help to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Existing Parkinson’s treatments can help with some of the symptoms but are unable to slow or reverse the loss of neurons. Scientists feel that the medication Terazosin may help by activating an enzyme called PGK1 to prevent brain cell death.

Researchers from the University of Iowa and the Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders examined over 17,000 participants. Patients on the drugs targeting PGK1 appeared to fare better in terms of Parkinson’s disease symptoms and progression.

Researchers are hopeful for further clinical trials testing the use of this medication in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The findings have been published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

A medicine for enlarged prostates may benefit brain cells damaged by Parkinson’s, scientists find.

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Heart Health

Daytime naps once or twice a week may be linked to a healthy heart, researchers say

😴❤Researchers have found that taking a daytime nap once or twice a week may lower the risk of heart attacks or strokes.❤😴

Researchers from the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland researched the association between napping frequency and duration and the risk of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease complications.

Scientists studied 3,462 people between the ages of 35 and 75 for just over five years. It was found that those who napped occasionally (once or twice a week, for between five minutes to an hour), were 48% less likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or heart failure than those who did not nap at all.

More research is needed to establish a causal relationship. The findings have been published in Heart, the journal of the British Cardiovascular Society.

Some good news for nap fanatics — a new study has found that a daytime nap taken once or twice a week could lower the risk of heart attacks or strokes.

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Multiple Sclerosis

'Harry Potter' author JK Rowling gives $18.8 million gift for MS research

Author J.K. Rowling has made a substantial donation (15.3 million pounds, or about $18.8 million) for new facilities at a multiple sclerosis research center at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Rowling made another donation in 2010, starting the Anne Rowling clinic at the university, named after her mother who passed due to MS at 45.

“Harry Potter” author J.K. Rowling made an $18.8 million donation for research into multiple sclerosis treatment at a center named for her mother.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Dr. Oz's Mother Has Alzheimer's: I'm Feeling Guilty Because I Completely Missed the Signs

Dr. Oz recently shared that his mother has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

A recent article from People shares some of the details regarding her diagnosis.

The host of The Dr. Oz Show also learned that he carries one of the genes for Alzheimer’s

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Diabetes

Carrying too much belly fat is strongly linked to diabetes and heart disease especially for women

Recent research shows that carrying visceral fat, the fat stored around the organs in the belly and around the intestines, appears to be a significant risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, particularly in women.

Researchers from Uppsala University studied more than 325,000 participants taking part in UK Biobank. It was found that visceral fat is a possible causal risk factor for hypertension (high blood pressure), heart attack/angina, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia (when the blood has too many lipids).

The findings have been published in Nature Medicine.

A new large-scale European study has found that carrying visceral fat, which is the fat stored around the organs in the belly and around the intestines, appears to be a major risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, especially among women. Carried out by researchers from Uppsa…

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Liver Disease

Complications of hepatitis C: Symptoms and when to see a doctor

Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes inflammation of the liver. If left without treatment, it can cause complications, such as scarring and long term liver damage, which increases the risk of liver cancer.

A recent article from Medical News Today discusses Hepatitis C, symptoms and more.

Hepatitis C, or HCV, is a viral infection that causes inflammation of the liver. Over time, this can result in permanent liver damage and other health complications. Find out more about the complications of HCV here.

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Epilepsy

The different types of epilepsy

Epilepsy is not a single disease or condition. Instead, there are several kinds of epilepsy, with different symptoms and patterns.

A helpful article from WebMD helps explain the different types of epilepsy, and more.

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Arthritis

Kim Kardashian West reveals possible lupus diagnosis: What to know

Recently, it was revealed that Kim Kardashian received results for rheumatoid arthritis and lupus antibodies in her blood work.

However, often times these results can be a false-positive. It is revealed that she has had further testing, but results of her diagnosis have not yet been fully confirmed or denied.

Kim Kardashian West got some tough news recently after seeing a doctor for exhaustion, nausea and swollen hands. Her test results were positive for lupus antibodies.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Me and Momma 2014

💌We’ve received another touching moment from one of our community members. 💌

“This is my most cherished memory with my momma. I’m the youngest of 4 and the only girl. She was my best friend and I miss her every day. She put up a hard fight for 8 years. We lost her on 7/9/2015.”

Me and Momma 2014

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Heart Health

Heart health: Focus on healthful foods rather than diet type

Recent research shows that the type of diet a person follows is not as important as simply making sure it includes healthful foods. 🥑🍎🥗🍅🥕

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) compared the effects of three diets on heart disease risks. Each of the diets followed the DASH pattern while focusing on one main macronutrient: carbohydrates, proteins, or unsaturated fats.

In comparison with the baseline, all three diets had positive and prompt effects on heart health: all lowered the markers of inflammation and cardiac injury. Changing the composition of the macronutrients did not make a difference, suggesting that it does not matter whether the diet is high or low in healthful fats or carbs— the most important factor is the general healthfulness of the diet.

The findings have been published in the International Journal of Cardiology.

New research looks at proportions of macronutrients, such as carbs, protein, or fats, in three different diets and their effects on cardiovascular health.

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Asthma/Allergy

Medication May Not Prevent Asthma Attacks, Study Shows

A recent article from Forbes discusses findings from a study sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The study was investigating whether or not the issue of asthma attacks was or was not related to daily use of inhaled medications

The study, which included 295 people over age 12, tested for levels of eosinophils in participants’ sputum. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell seen in high numbers in patients with environmental allergies and asthma, and tend to be a marker for inflammatory types of asthma, which typically respond well to inhaled steroids.

It was found that nearly 75% of subjects had very low eosinophil counts, and that these individuals had no difference in response to long term inhaled steroids versus inhaled placebo.

The findings have been published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The standard recommendations for mild asthma management have traditionally included inhaled steroids. A recent study raises the issue that this may not be necessary for many patients.

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Arthritis

Knowing where to start when it comes to exercising with arthritis can be difficult.

A helpful resource from the Arthritis Foundation gives some tips for getting started, different types of exercise, and more.

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Parkinson's

Linda Ronstadt on Life After Parkinson's Stole Her Singing Voice: 'In My Mind, I Can Still Sing'

A recent article from People features Linda Ronstadt. The singer reflects on her journey with Parkinson’s disease.

She shares that, Parkinson’s has taken her physical ability to sing. However, she states, “In my mind — in my imagination — I can still sing.”

“It’s like not having a leg or an arm, but there’s nothing I can do about it,” the singer tells PEOPLE

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Asthma/Allergy

Adult-onset food allergies are becoming more common, with women most at risk

A recent article from the Chicago Tribune discusses adult-onset food allergies.

According to a study published in January, adult-onset food allergies are becoming increasingly common, with almost 11% of U.S. adults having food allergies, some of which carried over from childhood, but about 48% were reported as new in the study.

Read more: https://bit.ly/2lYbybN


Nearly 11 percent of U.S. adults have food allergies, some of which carried over from childhood, but about 48% were reported as new, a recent study found.

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Diabetes

How can diabetes cause joint pain? Symptoms and treatment

Some individuals with diabetes may find that they experience joint pain.

A helpful recent article from Medical News Today discusses some of the various ways in which diabetes can cause joint pain, possible treatment options, and more.

Diabetes can lead to joint pain by affecting the muscles, skeleton, and nervous system. It also has links with two types of arthritis. Learn more here.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Crohn's Disease Symptoms in Women

A recent article from U.S. News and World Report discusses Crohn’s disease in females and how symptoms and signs may differ when compared to Crohn’s in males.

This inflammatory bowel disease can cause additional challenges for women.

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Asthma/Allergy

A Patient's Guide to Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)

The National Eczema Association reports that approximately 10% of the world population experiences atopic dermatitis at some point in their lives.

A recent article from U.S. News and World Report discusses atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, as well as symptoms, causes, treatments, and more.

Learn about symptoms, causes and treatment options for this common skin condition.

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Multiple Sclerosis

Rejuvenating brain stem cells may hold key to future MS treatments

Researchers are studying ways to make older brain stem cells more youthful.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom studied oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), a type of stem cell. OPCs are important in the healthy functioning of the brain and the rest of the central nervous system. OPCs mature into oligodendrocytes, which produce the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve fibers and preserves the electrical signals that they carry. Destruction of myelin is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis, and changes related to aging OPCs contribute to the process.

Using a mouse model, scientists transplanted OPCs from older rats into the brains of younger rats, and the aged OPCs began to function like youthful OPCs.

More research is needed to understand this phenomenon, and its potential uses in those who have conditions such as MS. The study has been published in Nature.

Scientists have found a way to rejuvenate brain stem cells in rats. The finding offers clues on how to restore lost brain function in diseases such as MS.

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Epilepsy

Safety First: How do I start exercising?

🏋️‍♂️Many with epilepsy may be interested in exercising, but may not know where to begin. 🏃‍♀️

A helpful resource from the Epilepsy Foundation of America discusses how to get started with incorporating exercise into your life, as well as some helpful tips.

Read more: https://bit.ly/2KxW85p


Want to know how to safely exercise? Read our top ten tips on how to get started today!

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