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Diabetes

What to Do About Hard-to-Control Type 1 Diabetes, Aka Brittle Diabetes

Have you ever heard of “brittle” diabetes?

The concept was introduced in the 1930s, and essentially described Type 1 diabetes that seemed to be chronically unstable.While there’s no standardized definition for brittle diabetes, it generally refers to blood sugar levels that quickly swing from low (hypoglycemia) to high (hyperglycemia). It is also known as labile diabetes.

A recent article from U.S. News and World Report discusses difficult-to-control type 1 diabetes, some possible causes, and more.

Learn about the symptoms and causes of this severe form of diabetes.

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Arthritis

Arthritis Tied to Heart Disease. Pain Relievers May Be to Blame.

Osteoarthritis has previously been linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Recent research suggests that a significant portion of the risk comes from the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, or NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), or some prescription NSAIDs.

Researchers studied data from over 30,000 participants. It was found that when compared with healthy people, those with osteoarthritis had a 42 percent increased risk for congestive heart failure, a 17 percent increased risk for coronary heart disease, and a 14 percent increased risk for stroke. They calculated that 41 percent of the increased risk for any cardiovascular event was attributable to the use of NSAIDs.

More research is needed to establish a cause and effect relationship. The findings from this study have been published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology.

Pain relievers such as ibuprofen and naproxen may account for higher rates of heart disease and stroke in those with osteoarthritis.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Too Much Napping May Signal Alzheimer's

Recent research shows that excessive napping may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have found that the areas of the brain that keep you awake during the day are damaged in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, which is why those with the condition may nap excessively long before they start to forget things. Further, the scientists also found that damage to those brain regions was caused by the protein tau. This gives more evidence that tau may play a larger role in Alzheimer’s than the amyloid protein.

The findings were recently published in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

Areas of the brain that keep you awake during the day are damaged in the early stages of the memory-robbing disease, which is why people with Alzheimer’s may nap excessively long before they start to struggle with forgetting things, the study authors said.

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Heart Health

A plant-based diet might help your heart and longevity, study suggests

Results from a new study suggest that eating more plants and less meat may be tied to an increase in life expectancy and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Researchers studied data on 12,168 middle-aged adults in the United States. It was found that those who followed diets with mostly plant-based foods, compared with those who had the lowest adherence, had a 16% lower risk of cardiovascular disease, approximately 32% lower risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease, and 18-25% lower risk of early death from any cause.

More research is needed to determine if a causal relationship exists. The findings have been published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Sticking to a plant-based diet or a diet of more plant foods than animal foods could be linked with a 16% lower risk of cardiovascular disease and up to 25% lower risk of early death, according to a new study.

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Asthma/Allergy

For Kids With Asthma, Allergies, New School Year Can Bring Flare-Ups

As we enter late summer (and a new school year), many people can face an increase in allergy flares, particularly as fall sets in.

A recent article from HealthDay News discusses some tips for helping to combat the onset of fall allergies.

As kids head back to school, it’s important for parents to keep potential asthma and allergy challenges in mind.

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Migraines

Here's How Much Caffeine May Trigger a Migraine, According to a New Study

Recent research suggests that having more than two servings of caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea and soda in a day is the tipping point at which caffeine becomes a migraine trigger. A serving is usually defined as eight ounces of coffee, six ounces of tea, 12 ounces of soda or two ounces of an energy drink. The study did not distinguish between types of caffeinated beverages.

Researchers running the small study asked 98 adults who suffered two to 15 migraines per month to log their caffeine intake twice a day for six weeks, along with information about other possible migraine triggers. It was found that one or two caffeinated beverages per day wasn’t statistically associated with a higher chance of migraine, but three or more was linked to a higher risk of headaches.

Further research is needed on the subject. The findings have been published in the American Journal of Medicine.

It can be both a treatment and a trigger

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Researchers from the University of Exeter are studying the relationship between IBD symptoms and the...

Researchers from the University of Exeter are studying the relationship between IBD symptoms and the development of depression.

After studying 120 study participants, it was found that 68 participants had Crohn’s disease and 49 had ulcerative colitis. Of these patients, 35 had active disease and 26 had depression. Those who had depression were more likely to be female, lacked social support, had active disease, and were taking corticosteroids, but not TNF-alpha inhibitors, while exhibiting less positive emotional recognition bias.

More research is needed to fully understand the link. The findings from this study have been published in the journal Neurogastroenterology & Motility.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Could a blood test help predict the development of Alzheimer's?

Scientists at the Washington University used mass spectrometry to measure amounts of two types of amyloid beta in the blood: amyloid beta 40 and 42.

They found the ratio of these types in the blood goes down as the amount of the substance in the brain increases. The new test may be able to warn of amyloid deposits forming years before they can be identified by PET scans.

When combined with risk factor evaluation, the test is said to have a 94 percent accuracy. It is hoped that early detection will allow people to take action to slow down disease progression.

The findings have been published in Neurology.

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Diabetes

Diabetes – what it is, what it is, what are some treatments.

A helpful resource from Mayo Clinic gives information regarding this condition, possible causes, diagnosis, treatments, and more.

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Lupus

Vet Vowed to Run First Half Marathon After Lupus Flare Put Her in Kidney Failure

A recent article from Runner’s World shares the journey of Stacey Halse, a lupus warrior who fell in love with running.

It shares her journey through lupus flares, kidney failure, and participating in half-marathons, 10K and 5K runs.

At first, Stacey Halse’s doctors weren’t thrilled, but she was determined to do it safe—and do it big.

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Liver Disease

Fatty liver disease: An often-silent condition linked to heart disease - Harvard Health

A recent article from Harvard Health Publishing discusses NAFLD, possible links to heart disease, and more. The article covers diagnosis and possible treatments.

As many as one in four Americans has a potentially dangerous accumulation of fat in the liver. Known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, it is closely linked to obesity and diabetes and may boost heart disease risk. The milder form of the disease, n…

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Heart Health

5 Heart Disease and Diabetes Risk Factors That Should Be on Your Radar

A recent article from Healthline discusses five risk factors for heart disease and diabetes that the Endocrine Society recommends are regularly assessed.

Regular screenings in these five areas can help you reduce your risk for developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

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Parkinson's

Playing the piano helps my Parkinson's disease

A recent article from BBC News shares one man’s Parkinson’s story, and how he feels learning to play the piano has helped him.

While many organizations suggest exercise to help with symptoms, Parkinson’s UK has reportedly said that music could help people and called for more research.

What are some activities you find help ease your symptoms? Share below!

Derick Davies has written a song about his experiences to inspire others with the disease.

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Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis & Jaw Pain - Rheumatology Advisor

A recent article from Rheumatology Advisor discusses jaw pain and rheumatoid arthritis, some tips, possible treatments and more.

Examining rheumatoid arthritis and jaw pain: prevalence, symptoms, and tips for your patients to better manage their pain.

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Asthma/Allergy

Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought

Recent research shows that sesame allergies in the United States may be more widespread than initially thought.

Researchers from Northwestern Medicine and Lurie Children’s Hospital studied data from nearly 80,000 people. It was found that about .49% reported having an allergy to sesame. Of these .49%, about two-thirds (.34% of the U.S. population) either received a diagnosis from a doctor or had allergic reactions. The researchers are confident that over a million people in the U.S. have sesame allergies, based on their data.

The findings have been published in JAMA Network Open.

New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food labels.

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Multiple Sclerosis

Selma Blair tries breakthrough stem cell treatment for MS

We received several questions regarding our last post, which discussed the Selma Blair’s MS treatment.

A recent article from Good Morning America gives further information. She is undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Doctors are attempting to “reboot the immune system” of MS patients. The hope is that it will stop the attack on the brain and spinal cord.

The actress is giving her fans an up close view of her life with MS.

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Asthma/Allergy

Stave Off Your Indoor Allergies This Summer

Indoor allergens can persist year-round.

A recent article from U.S. News and World Report discusses indoor allergens and some tips for managing them throughout the year.

Don’t let indoor allergies spoil your summer fun.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's: Common gene explains why some drugs fail

Recent research shows that a certain gene may explain why some Alzheimer’s drugs work in certain people but may fail in others.

The gene is called CHRFAM7A, and it is specific to humans, though only 75% of people have it. It is a fusion gene, a fusion between a gene that encodes a receptor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and a type of enzyme called a kinase. Acetylcholine plays a key role in memory and learning, and researchers have long linked it with the development of Alzheimer’s.

Further research is needed to understand this concept, but researchers hope this can help pave the way to more personalized approach toward treating Alzheimer’s. The findings were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, which took place in Los Angeles, CA.

A new study helps to explain why some Alzheimer’s drugs work in some people but not in others, and why some yet may succeed in animals but not in humans.

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Lupus

Up to 80 percent of people with lupus experience fatigue

A resource from the Lupus Foundation of America discusses some strategies for helping to manage fatigue, from listening to your body to aerobic exercise, planning ahead and more.

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Diabetes

A small study shows that taking vitamin D supplements may help diabetes

Recent research from a small study shows that taking vitamin D supplements may help to slow the progression of type 2 diabetes in those who have recently been diagnosed, or those with prediabetes.

Researchers at the Université Laval in Quebec, studied 96 participants who were either newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or at high risk of developing the disease. Half were randomly assigned to receive a high dose of vitamin D3 (5000iu) once a day for six months, while the other half were assigned to receive a daily placebo.

The researchers measured markers of insulin function and glucose metabolism before and after the six months. It was found that taking vitamin D supplements appeared to significantly improve the action of insulin in the muscle tissue of participants after six months.

It is emphasized that further research is needed to confirm and understand the findings. The findings have been published in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

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Liver Disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: New drug proves 'safe and effective'

Researchers in Austria are examining a new treatment for NAFLD.

Scientists are studying nor-urso, a modified version of ursodeoxycholic acid, a common oral drug that can alter the makeup of bile and may dissolve gallstones. The study authors stated, “In conclusion, a 1,500-mg dosage of nor-urso “resulted in a significant reduction of serum ALT within 12 weeks of treatment, when compared with placebo.”

The findings have been published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial finds the right dosage at which a drug ‘safely’ treats nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

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Parkinson's

Parkinson's disease: Study finds novel€ way to reduce symptoms

A recent UK study has found that gentle, controlled stimulation of the ear canal can help reduce symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers from the University of Kent found that twice daily stimulation for two months was associated with a significant reduction in both motor and non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease.

PARKINSON’S disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs vital bodily functions. Slowing down the onset is essential to maintaining quality of life. One study identifies a novel approach to reducing symptoms.

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Heart Health

Is daily aspirin for heart health necessary?

According to a Harvard study, millions of people who take aspirin every day to prevent heart attacks may not truly need it.

According to the study, about 29 million people 40 and older took an aspirin a day in 2017 despite not having heart disease. It was found that only a marginal benefit, if any, could be found from routine aspirin use, and a study published this year in the journal JAMA Neurology found that taking low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk for bleeding within the skull for people without heart disease.

A Harvard study revealed that some 29 million who don’t have heart disease were taking aspirin every day in 2017.

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Migraines

Ocular migraine: Symptoms, causes, and risks

Ocular migraine causes visual disturbances, or aura, with or without the headache that tends to occur with typical migraine.

A recent article from Medical News Today discusses ocular migraines, what they are, symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, and more.

People with ocular migraine experience migraine episodes with visual symptoms. These can occur with or without a headache. Learn more in this article.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Sending Kids Out to Play May Help Prevent Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Recent research shows that sun exposure may help to prevent IBD in children.

Researchers studied over 500 participants up to the age of 17. Parents or guardians completed questionnaires about children’s sun exposure during summer and winter, and how often children used sunscreen or covered up when they went outside.

It was found that the potential for sunlight to help protect against IBD was similar for boys and girls and for older and younger children, a darker tan was also associated with a lower risk of IBD, and that the use of sunblock didn’t appear to influence the potential for sunlight exposure to reduce the risk of IBD.

More research is needed to fully understand the possible link. The findings have been published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

Children who spend more time outdoors may be less likely to develop inflammatory bowel disease than kids who mostly stay inside, a new study suggests.

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Liver Disease

Today is World Hepatitis Day. Taking action and raise awareness.

Today is World Hepatitis Day. This day is for taking action and raise awareness to help find the millions of undiagnosed individuals with hepatitis.

According to the World Hepatitis Alliance: 🔬 300 million people worldwide are living with viral hepatitis and are unaware they have it. 🔬 Viral hepatitis causes up to 1.34 million deaths per year. 🔬 A cure for hepatitis C and treatment and a vaccine for hepatitis B exists.

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Parkinson's

Motion-tracking watch future of Parkinson's care

UK researchers are testing the use of a smartwatch to help with monitoring Parkinson’s symptoms.

Known as the personal Kinetigraph (PKG), the device monitors motor symptoms such as tremors, involuntary movements (dyskinesia) and slowness of movement (bradykinesia), as well as reminds the wearer to take medications.

The research is ongoing.

The smartwatch-style device, worn by patients at home, monitors tremors and other symptoms.

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Multiple Sclerosis

Selma Blair Celebrates Shaved Head in Emotional Post After Latest Round of MS Treatment

A recent article from People features Selma Blair celebrating finishing an intense round of treatment for her MS, and reflecting on her journey thus far.

Selma Blair is showing off her shaved head after completing a new round of treatment for her MS

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Diabetes

A Plant-Based Diet Can Reduce Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

A recent article from Healthline discusses how a plant-based diet may help to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially in individuals who are pre-diabetic.

Experts say not all plant-based diets are the same. They offer specific advice on how to get the most out of your nutrition plans.

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Arthritis

Arthritis And Exercise: Why It Helps To Be More Physically Active

Exercise is important for those who have arthritis. From aerobic exercises to strength training, there are many forms and options in terms of exercise for those with arthritis.

More than 50 million U.S. adults have arthritis. Many experience severe joint pain and, likely because of their pain, don’t do much exercising if at all.

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Heart Health

How an omega-6 fatty acid may keep heart disease at bay

A recent article from Medical News Today discusses how omega-6 fatty acids may be beneficial against atherosclerosis.

New research in mouse cells sheds light on some mechanisms that help explain how dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, an omega-6, prevents atherosclerosis.

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Asthma/Allergy

Special skin care may be beneficial for babies with eczema

Recent research shows that special skin care could be beneficial in preventing the development of food allergies, asthma, and more in babies with eczema.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Ulcerative colitis: Fresh approaches to taming inflammation

A short video from Nature discusses various approaches towards treating inflammation due to ulcerative colitis.

Ulcerative colitis is a common form of inflammatory bowel disease. For many people with the condition, widely prescribed anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressi…

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Multiple Sclerosis

Need to Know: Managing Stress When You Have MS

A recent article from MS News Today discusses the importance of managing stress, and the effects that stress can have on multiple sclerosis.

Columnist Tamara Sellman writes about the importance of managing further attacks on an already compromised immune system.

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Alzheimer's Disease

New clues on why women's Alzheimer's risk differs from men's

Researchers have found differences in how tau, a protein that forms tangles that destroy nerve cells, spreads in the brains of women compared to men.

Scientists at Vanderbilt University studied scans on 301 people with normal thinking skills and 161 others with mild impairment. They mapped the tau deposits and correlated them with nerve networks. It was found that tau networks in women with mild impairment were more spread out, suggesting that more areas of the brain were affected.

Further research is needed to understand the differences in disease progression among females and males. The study findings were presented this week at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Los Angeles, California.

Two-thirds of Alzheimer’s cases in the United States are in women, and it’s not just because women live longer, experts say.

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Diabetes

Staying Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can affect numerous parts of the body, from kidneys to the heart, and even eyes. A recent article from WebMD discusses some tips for staying healthy with type 2 diabetes.

You have a lot of power to determine what your future with type 2 diabetes looks like. Here are questions to ask your doctor to stay healthy.

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Liver Disease

Weight loss may lead to significant improvements in patients with NAFLD

Recent research shows that weight loss may lead to significant short and medium-term improvements in patients with NAFLD.

The findings have been published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Alzheimer's Disease

After multiple failures, Alzheimer's researchers turn their attention to inflammation

Researchers are beginning to focus their efforts on targeting brain inflammation in an effort to help treat Alzheimer’s. A recent article from NBC discusses these current efforts.

The past decade of Alzheimer’s disease research has been fraught with disappointment. But some scientists say they’re more hopeful than ever a cure will be found.

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Parkinson's

ESPN founder Bill Rasmussen announces he has Parkinson's disease

ESPN founder Bill Rasmussen has come forward to share his Parkinson’s diagnosis.

First diagnosed in 2014, he has decided to come forward in an effort to help promote awareness.

Bill Rasmussen, 86, co-founded ESPN in 1979 alongside his son, Scott. He said he was diagnosed with the disease in 2014

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Arthritis

Gluten and rheumatoid arthritis: Foods to eat and avoid

A recent article from Medical News Today discusses gluten and rheumatoid arthritis. Some individuals who have gluten tolerance issues may feel that gluten possibly irritates their rheumatoid arthritis. It is stressed that more formal research is needed on this topic.

Remember, speak with your doctor if you have concerns!

Some people find that eating gluten can trigger rheumatoid arthritis (RA) symptom flares. In this article, we discuss the link between gluten and RA, foods to eat and avoid, and when to see a doctor.

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