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Alzheimer's Disease

Too Much Napping May Signal Alzheimer's

Recent research shows that excessive napping may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have found that the areas of the brain that keep you awake during the day are damaged in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, which is why those with the condition may nap excessively long before they start to forget things. Further, the scientists also found that damage to those brain regions was caused by the protein tau. This gives more evidence that tau may play a larger role in Alzheimer’s than the amyloid protein.

The findings were recently published in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

Areas of the brain that keep you awake during the day are damaged in the early stages of the memory-robbing disease, which is why people with Alzheimer’s may nap excessively long before they start to struggle with forgetting things, the study authors said.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Could a blood test help predict the development of Alzheimer's?

Scientists at the Washington University used mass spectrometry to measure amounts of two types of amyloid beta in the blood: amyloid beta 40 and 42.

They found the ratio of these types in the blood goes down as the amount of the substance in the brain increases. The new test may be able to warn of amyloid deposits forming years before they can be identified by PET scans.

When combined with risk factor evaluation, the test is said to have a 94 percent accuracy. It is hoped that early detection will allow people to take action to slow down disease progression.

The findings have been published in Neurology.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's: Common gene explains why some drugs fail

Recent research shows that a certain gene may explain why some Alzheimer’s drugs work in certain people but may fail in others.

The gene is called CHRFAM7A, and it is specific to humans, though only 75% of people have it. It is a fusion gene, a fusion between a gene that encodes a receptor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and a type of enzyme called a kinase. Acetylcholine plays a key role in memory and learning, and researchers have long linked it with the development of Alzheimer’s.

Further research is needed to understand this concept, but researchers hope this can help pave the way to more personalized approach toward treating Alzheimer’s. The findings were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, which took place in Los Angeles, CA.

A new study helps to explain why some Alzheimer’s drugs work in some people but not in others, and why some yet may succeed in animals but not in humans.

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Alzheimer's Disease

New clues on why women's Alzheimer's risk differs from men's

Researchers have found differences in how tau, a protein that forms tangles that destroy nerve cells, spreads in the brains of women compared to men.

Scientists at Vanderbilt University studied scans on 301 people with normal thinking skills and 161 others with mild impairment. They mapped the tau deposits and correlated them with nerve networks. It was found that tau networks in women with mild impairment were more spread out, suggesting that more areas of the brain were affected.

Further research is needed to understand the differences in disease progression among females and males. The study findings were presented this week at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Los Angeles, California.

Two-thirds of Alzheimer’s cases in the United States are in women, and it’s not just because women live longer, experts say.

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Alzheimer's Disease

After multiple failures, Alzheimer's researchers turn their attention to inflammation

Researchers are beginning to focus their efforts on targeting brain inflammation in an effort to help treat Alzheimer’s. A recent article from NBC discusses these current efforts.

The past decade of Alzheimer’s disease research has been fraught with disappointment. But some scientists say they’re more hopeful than ever a cure will be found.

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Alzheimer's Disease

Hypertension treatment may slow down Alzheimer's progression

Results from a small study published in the journal Hypertension show that a drug used to treat hypertension may help to improve blood flow to the brain in patients with Alzheimer’s.

It is emphasized that more research is needed across larger groups and for longer periods of time to fully understand the potential benefits.

New research finds that nilvadipine, a drug doctors commonly use to treat high blood pressure, increases the blood flow to the brain’s hippocampus.

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Alzheimer's Disease

This Is A Major Misconception About Caring For Someone With Alzheimer's

A recent article from Women’s Health shares “12 Things No One Tells You About Alzheimer’s.”

Each one comes from either a medical professional or a caregiver, and ranges from the ability to still have meaningful relationships, to exercise, progression, and more.

What’s one thing you would add to the list? Share below!

So someone you love was diagnosed…now what?

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Alzheimer's Disease

Possible Alzheimer's prevention breakthrough reported

Researchers from the University of New Mexico are testing a possible vaccine they developed to help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

The vaccine has been tested on groups of mice with Alzheimer’s. The vaccine targets pathological tau, a protein commonly found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. The vaccine appears to have cleared out the pathological tau in the mice tested.

More research is needed to continue developing the vaccine, in addition to human trials.

Read more: https://bit.ly/2Iwjclg
University of New Mexico researchers say they’ve apparently found way to prevent formation of brain protein instrumental in disease’s development

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Alzheimer's Disease

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE FROM MY PERSPECTIVE | Marieta Kysel | TEDxYouth@ECP

Marieta is a 16-year-old who grew up in Morava and spent most of her early childhood with her grandmother. In her TED talk, Marieta discusses what her grandmother’s journey with Alzheimer’s has taught her.

Marieta is a 16-year-old ECP student who grew up in Morava and spent most of her early childhood in her grandmother’s company. When she was told her grandmot…

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Alzheimer's Disease

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. According to the Alzheimer's Association, worldwide,...

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, worldwide, 50 million people are living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

This month, in an effort to help promote awareness, we will be sharing stories from members of our community.

Is there a story you would like to share about your journey, or a family member’s journey? How you’ve learned to cope with your new normal? An “A-ha” moment? Poems, songs, and more are also welcome!

If you’d like to share a story, please message it to us. We’d love to hear it! 💜

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