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Epilepsy

Seizure First Aid and Safety

Seizures and epilepsy are among the most common neurological problems affecting children and youth. According to the Epilepsy Foundation of America:

🧠1 out of 10 people worldwide will have a seizure in their lifetime. 🧠 Epilepsy, or recurring seizures, develops in 1 in 26 people during their lifetime.

There are steps that can be taken with regards to seizure first aid and safety. A helpful resource from the Epilepsy Foundation of America helps to explain some steps that can be taken.

Find videos and information about what to do when someone has a seizure.

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Epilepsy

The different types of epilepsy

Epilepsy is not a single disease or condition. Instead, there are several kinds of epilepsy, with different symptoms and patterns.

A helpful article from WebMD helps explain the different types of epilepsy, and more.

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Epilepsy

Safety First: How do I start exercising?

🏋️‍♂️Many with epilepsy may be interested in exercising, but may not know where to begin. 🏃‍♀️

A helpful resource from the Epilepsy Foundation of America discusses how to get started with incorporating exercise into your life, as well as some helpful tips.

Read more: https://bit.ly/2KxW85p


Want to know how to safely exercise? Read our top ten tips on how to get started today!

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Epilepsy

Epilepsy Foundation of America

Curious about service dogs for those with epilepsy? A helpful article from the Epilepsy Foundation of America gives further insight into the service animals.

Do you have a service dog? Share below!


Learn about the benefits of service dogs for children with epilepsy and the importance of involving a parent or adult partner in training. Start here: https://bit.ly/2yZqzxl

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Epilepsy

Types of Seizures

Seizures can take many forms. A helpful resource from the Epilepsy Foundation of America discusses the different types of seizures, what they can look like, and more.

Read more: https://bit.ly/2i24q8O


Learn about the many seizure types. Knowing which ones you have can help your doctor find the right treatment.

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Epilepsy

For some people with epilepsy, stress can be a seizure trigger. A resource from the Epilepsy...

For some people with epilepsy, stress can be a seizure trigger. A resource from the Epilepsy Foundation of America discusses stress, how it affects the body, and some tips for managing it.

What are some ways you manage stress? Share below!💜

Read more:

https://bit.ly/2Gvr3zc

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Epilepsy

How Cameron Boyce’s Epilepsy May Have Caused His Death at 20

Actor Cameron Boyce recently passed away at the age of 20. The Disney Channel actor had epilepsy, and passed away after a nighttime seizure.

It is reported that this is likely a case of SUDEP (sudden unexplained death in epilepsy). Approximately 70 percent of SUDEP cases occur during sleep.

Read more: https://nyti.ms/2XGU8xv


The Disney Channel star’s family released a statement confirming his medical condition, which led to a fatal seizure over the weekend. In the U.S., about 2,600 people a year die from a disorder known as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

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Epilepsy

What is epilepsy? Here's what you need to know about the seizure-causing spectrum of disorders

🧠There’s a lot more to epilepsy than most people think. A recent article from CNN takes a look at epilepsy and breaks down the seizure-causing spectrum of disorders.🧠

Read more: https://cnn.it/2JqDgY0


An estimated 2.3 million adults in the United States have epilepsy.

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Epilepsy

Another inspirational inbox message from a community member!

💌Another inspirational inbox message from a community member! 💌


Hello, I am currently 20 years old. My life hasn’t been particularly easy suffering from Epilepsy, but with the support of my family I have achieved the impossible…

Ever since I was born, I suffered with epilepsy and would have seizures three times a day. I was told by doctors I may never speak as the epilepsy impacted in my language quarter of my brain, being told I would need one to one support for the rest of my life and would never gain independence. As I was growing up, I was told about this, but me and my mum believed that we could do more to help with my communication. Even though I was having regular seizures as a child, my mum started to teach me sign language, which I still use and remember since I was a child. The doctors said I may never learn another language, but with the help and support from research into epilepsy, we was able to overcome the communication boundary and I have left college with a Higher National Diploma in Art and Design, passing my English and continue to surprise my family with my vocabulary.

This is just one of the amazing turns in my life, as after unfortunately more life-threatening seizures when reaching my teenage hood, it effected my attendance, friendships with my peers and my own self esteem. I was back and forth in and out of Great Ormand Street. Until, a spiral of events happened, after an Epileptic Fit over Five years ago now, leaving me in a wheelchair. At many times I thought of giving up, but with help from the people around me I pushed though, relearning how to walk and continue with my education..

But what shocked me the most is two years after the impacting seizure. All signs of epilepsy disappeared.. I know that this does not happen for some. But it did for me, and since.. this is where my life has taken me.

Yesterday, I passed my Practical driving. I have left with a merit in my Higher National Diploma in Art and Design, I have been accepted for many interviews, I have been able to become more independent, able to cook my own meals with out supervision and the best part is I will be on the road soon.

If I gave up many years ago, my life wouldn’t be where it has taken me today. Without the support of my friends and family, I don’t know what I would have done and it has taught me a valuable lesson: not to give up and fight though the hard times to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Stay strong Epilepsy Fighters! And don’t give up.

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Epilepsy

We love hearing from our community members! One of our members recently shared the following with...

We love hearing from our community members! One of our members recently shared the following with us:

“Another inspiring story that I share every year: this is my family, and I suffer from epilepsy. But this time my family is with me, my Father, Mother, Wife and 8 month old Daughter. All are supportive when I say that it’s monsoon and I wanna go trekking, well this is what we have achieved this year: 3028 ft above sea level with heavy rains with a small kid through different terrains. The only thing that I want to share with fellow people who are restricted like me because of epilepsy: share it with your friends and family and they will never give up on you… Keep Inspiring! 🤘🏼”

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Epilepsy

A little girl noticed that hospitalized kids didn't have stuffed animals. So, she did something about it

A recent article from CNN discusses the heartwarming story of one epilepsy patient’s desire to help other kids, and even adults, in the hospital.

Seven-year-old Alex Walker always brings her stuffed bear with her during hospital stays. However, she noticed that a lot of other people in the hospital don’t have a “friend” with them. Since then, she works with her parents to gather donations to buy comfort items that can be distributed at hospitals.

Do you have any items that help to bring you comfort during hospital stays? Share below!

Read more: https://cnn.it/2RawXKv


A 7-year-old with epilepsy has spent a lot of time in the hospital — and she’s always had her teddy bear to comfort her. But she noticed that other kids didn’t. So, she went on a mission to provide stuffed animals to children in hospitals, foster care and emergency situations.

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