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Parkinson's

Billionaire Ken Griffin, Michael J. Fox Foundation stage $10M competition

The Michael J. Fox Foundation is partnering with Ken Griffin to hold a $10 million competition in an effort to spur development of a critical research tool for Parkinson’s disease.

The program is offering a cash incentive for researchers to devise a tracer compound that can bind to a protein in the brain known as alpha-synuclein and illuminate its volume and location on a brain scan.

The majority of the 6 million people living with Parkinson’s worldwide have clumps of alpha-synuclein in their brain, and it is believed to harm cells and result in symptoms of the disease.

The hedge fund manager and the actor, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 1991, are teaming up to find a cure.

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Parkinson's

How 'exergaming' can help people with Parkinson's

A recent article from Medical News Today discusses how exergaming, that is, exercise paired with computer gaming, can be beneficial to those with Parkinson’s.

Researchers from the Department of Neurology at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour at Radboud University Medical Center studied a control group (who did stretching exercises), and a second group (who used stationary bikes at home). The latter group showed a significant improvement in motor ability — comparable with that achieved by several conventional Parkinson’s drugs.

The bike group, who cycled 30–45 minutes three times per week for 6 months, received exercise bikes with screens and games designed to motivate them. It was found that Parkinson’s patients who exercised with bikes had significantly improved their motor ability compared with those who simply stretched.

Further research is needed on the subject to fully understand possible benefits. The findings have been published in The Lancet Neurology.

New research investigates the benefits of an at-home computer game exercising program for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

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Parkinson's

Prostate drug may slow Parkinson's disease

Recent research shows that a prostate medication may help to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Existing Parkinson’s treatments can help with some of the symptoms but are unable to slow or reverse the loss of neurons. Scientists feel that the medication Terazosin may help by activating an enzyme called PGK1 to prevent brain cell death.

Researchers from the University of Iowa and the Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders examined over 17,000 participants. Patients on the drugs targeting PGK1 appeared to fare better in terms of Parkinson’s disease symptoms and progression.

Researchers are hopeful for further clinical trials testing the use of this medication in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The findings have been published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

A medicine for enlarged prostates may benefit brain cells damaged by Parkinson’s, scientists find.

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Parkinson's

Linda Ronstadt on Life After Parkinson's Stole Her Singing Voice: 'In My Mind, I Can Still Sing'

A recent article from People features Linda Ronstadt. The singer reflects on her journey with Parkinson’s disease.

She shares that, Parkinson’s has taken her physical ability to sing. However, she states, “In my mind — in my imagination — I can still sing.”

“It’s like not having a leg or an arm, but there’s nothing I can do about it,” the singer tells PEOPLE

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Parkinson's

New for People with MS, Parkinson's: Exosuit May Make Walking Easier

A recent article from Healthline discusses the exosuit, a new wearable device similar to the exoskeleton, but with more freedom.

The suit was developed by Harvard researchers seeking to offer Parkinson’s and MS patients more ease of movement, but also to create a more wearable and functional device.

Findings regarding the exosuit have been published in the journal Science.

Harvard researchers develop a hip-hugging suit that adapts with a person’s movements to help them walk as well as run.

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Parkinson's

Could estrogen help treat Parkinson's?

Researchers are studying the use of estrogen to help combat Parkinson’s disease.

Harvard researchers used a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. They treated the mice with DHED, a chemical that boosts estrogen levels in the brain.

The motor function of male and female mice before and after treatment was then compared, in addition to how alpha-synuclein behaved in the brain and the rate of neuron death. The female mice had less severe symptoms than the male mice, but estrogen treatment still improved their symptoms. In male mice, estrogen slowed the loss of nerve fibers and improved motor symptoms. Estrogen reduced the buildup of mutated alpha-synuclein.

Research is needed in humans to understand the potential benefits further.

Several studies have hinted at the neuroprotective effects of estrogen. A recent study in mice looks at how it might defend against Parkinson’s disease.

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Parkinson's

Playing the piano helps my Parkinson's disease

A recent article from BBC News shares one man’s Parkinson’s story, and how he feels learning to play the piano has helped him.

While many organizations suggest exercise to help with symptoms, Parkinson’s UK has reportedly said that music could help people and called for more research.

What are some activities you find help ease your symptoms? Share below!

Derick Davies has written a song about his experiences to inspire others with the disease.

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Parkinson's

Parkinson's disease: Study finds novel€ way to reduce symptoms

A recent UK study has found that gentle, controlled stimulation of the ear canal can help reduce symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers from the University of Kent found that twice daily stimulation for two months was associated with a significant reduction in both motor and non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease.

PARKINSON’S disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs vital bodily functions. Slowing down the onset is essential to maintaining quality of life. One study identifies a novel approach to reducing symptoms.

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Parkinson's

Motion-tracking watch future of Parkinson's care

UK researchers are testing the use of a smartwatch to help with monitoring Parkinson’s symptoms.

Known as the personal Kinetigraph (PKG), the device monitors motor symptoms such as tremors, involuntary movements (dyskinesia) and slowness of movement (bradykinesia), as well as reminds the wearer to take medications.

The research is ongoing.

The smartwatch-style device, worn by patients at home, monitors tremors and other symptoms.

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Parkinson's

ESPN founder Bill Rasmussen announces he has Parkinson's disease

ESPN founder Bill Rasmussen has come forward to share his Parkinson’s diagnosis.

First diagnosed in 2014, he has decided to come forward in an effort to help promote awareness.

Bill Rasmussen, 86, co-founded ESPN in 1979 alongside his son, Scott. He said he was diagnosed with the disease in 2014

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Parkinson's

People with Parkinson's Can Increase Their Mobility with Mindful Yoga

Research from a small study shows that practicing mindful yoga can help to decrease anxiety and depression and increase mobility in those with Parkinson’s. 🧘‍♂️🧘‍♀️

Have you tried yoga? Share below!

Researchers say yoga can also help people with Parkinson’s decrease their symptoms of anxiety and depression.

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Parkinson's

Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain

🧠Recent research from a small study has found what could be the earliest signs of Parkinson’s, years before patients showed symptoms.🧠

Researchers from King’s College London studied data from 14 individuals carrying a genetic mutation that puts them at high risk of developing the disease at some stage in their life. They also included data from 65 non-genetic Parkinson’s patients and 25 healthy volunteers.

It was found that changes in the serotonin system in the brains of Parkinson’s sufferers started to malfunction well before other symptoms occurred.

It is hoped that this can help with the discovery of new and better treatments that could slow the loss of brain cells in Parkinson’s. Scientists urge that further research is needed to understand this discovery.

The findings have been published in The Lancet Neurology.

Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson’s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people. Parkinson’s, a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive

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Parkinson's

How boxing changed my life after a Parkinson's diagnosis at age 32

A recent article from Well+Good discusses Jennifer Parkinson’s battle with Parkinson’s following her diagnosis at age 32. It chronicles her journey with the disease, and how boxing has been of substantial help.

Have you ever tried boxing to help with your symptoms? Share below!

I looked the neurologist straight in the eyes and said, “I’m going to prove you wrong.”

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Parkinson's

How ultrasound could help curb Parkinson's

🔬🧠A recent article from Medical News Today discusses how scientists at Columbia University are researching the use of focused ultrasound to help safely and precisely deliver the use of Parkinson’s treatments across the blood brain barrier. 🧠🔬

Early findings have been published in the Journal of Controlled Release.

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Parkinson's

Strategies to Combat Freezing in Parkinson's Patients

Often times, Parkinson’s patients in the later stages of the disease experience what is known as “freezing.” Freezing is when an individual suddenly feels as if they are glued to the ground. It can occur while the person is in motion, or after being stationary and then attempting to move.

A recent article from Parkinson’s Disease News discusses freezing, and some ways to help combat it. Be sure to always discuss symptoms such as freezing with your doctor!

Columnist Mary Beth Skylis recounts her dad’s experiences with gait freezing and shares strategies for managing the symptom.

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Parkinson's

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research

A recent article from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research discusses tips for boosting brain health. Which one is your favorite?

You can take steps to keep your brain as healthy as possible. Boost your brain health with these tips.

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Parkinson's

These common health problems could be early signs of Parkinson's

A recent article from CNN discusses some of the possible early signs of Parkinson’s disease. These symptoms can sometimes appear long before the more well-known movement symptoms.

Do you move around a lot during your sleep? Or have you lost your sense of smell? New insights into Parkinson’s disease suggest that these might be the early signs of changes in the brain that mean you are at greater risk of developing Parkinson’s.

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Parkinson's

Parkinson's is 3 TIMES more likely in those who had appendix removed

Recent research suggests that those who have had their appendix removed may be at a higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center studied more than 62 million patients, and found those who that had had the removal operation were at a three-fold greater risk of developing Parkinson’s.

New Case Western University research on 62 million patients found that nearly one percent of those who had appendectomies got Parkinson’s - three times more than those didn’t.

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Parkinson's

Dancing Helps People With Parkinson's Disease

An interesting recent article from Forbes discusses dance as a form of movement therapy for those with Parkinson’s.

Have you ever tried dance to help ease some of your symptoms? Share below! 💃🕺

For people with Parkinson’s Disease, regular dance classes help control their balance and movement.

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